Centenary of Armistice 2018

Knitted Poppies in the grounds of the Memorial

Knitted red poppy flowers on the Memorial’s grounds. Each poppy represents an Australian listed on the Memorial’s Roll of Honour.

In November 2018, we commemorate the centenary of the Armistice that ended the First World War (1914-18).

A creative public program at the Australian War Memorial will combine public activities, displays, installations and events for the five week period from 5 October to Remembrance Day, on 11 November 2018.

The centrepiece to the commemorations will be the installation of 62,000 knitted red poppy flowers on the Memorial’s grounds. Each poppy represents an Australian life lost in the First World War, who are individually listed on the Memorial’s Roll of Honour.

Key Events

The following activities will take place for five weeks, from 5 October until 11 November:

  • 62,000 poppies installation including musical experience and night time lighting
  • Special exhibition on the consequences of war
  • Roll of Honour name projections, each night from dusk to dawn
  • Roll of Honour names and ages audio experience, read by primary school children
  • Digital and social media support program allowing Australians to participate in the Memorial’s commemorative activities no matter where they are located

The following activities will take place from 9 November until 11 November (in addition to the activities listed above):

  • Beam of light projected from the parapet of the Memorial to Australian Parliament House
  • Photographic image projections onto the trees within the Memorial grounds

The Remembrance Day National Ceremony will be held on Sunday, 11 November.

Find out more about what’s on at the Australian War Memorial and plan your visit.

62,000 Poppies Display

Central to the Armistice commemorative program is the placement of 62,000 knitted poppy flowers in the Sculpture Garden on the Memorial’s western grounds by the founders of the 5,000 Poppies project . Each poppy in this spectacular and moving display has been created by hand by a volunteer in honour of those Australians killed while serving in the First World War.

Complementing the knitted poppies display is a moving musical program assembled by Memorial artist in residence Chris Latham.

This is a free event. Night time lighting will allow visitors to access the display through to 10pm each day. The Commemorative Area and Roll of Honour will also be open to the public for a select number of evenings throughout this period.

 

poppies in the Memorial grounds

Remembrance Day 2018

Remembrance Day has a special significance in 2018, marking the centenary of the Armistice which ended the First World War.

The Remembrance Day National Ceremony 2018 includes a formal wreathlaying, and Australia’s Federation Guard and the Band of the Royal Military College, Duntroon will be on parade.

Free tickets for the Remembrance Day National Ceremony will be available to book online from October 2018. 

The Remembrance Day Last Post ceremony will include the delivery of the Eulogy of the Unknown Australian Soldier.

For further enquiries please email: ceremony@awm.gov.au

The Armistice of Compiègne between the Allies and Germany came into effect at 11am on the 11 November 1918. The guns fell silent on the Western Front and after more than four years of unimaginable bloodshed and destruction, the war was finally over.

large crowds gathered in capital cities to celebrate the end of conflict

At home in Australia, large crowds gathered in capital cities to celebrate the end of conflict.

The Armistice of 1918

After several months of hard fighting on the Western Front, the Allies finally broke through the Hindenburg Line on 29 September 1918. The German army was beaten and within weeks came the Armistice.

The Armistice of Compiègne between the Allies and Germany came into effect at 11am on the 11 November 1918. The guns fell silent on the Western Front and after more than four years of unimaginable bloodshed and destruction, the war was finally over. At home in Australia, large crowds gathered in capital cities to celebrate the end of conflict.

The Armistice paved the way for the signing of a formal peace treaty, the Treaty of Versailles, and the end of the war six months later. On 28 June 1919, the treaty was signed in the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles, with Australian Prime Minister William Morris (Billy) Hughes and Deputy Prime Minister Joseph Cook adding their signatures on Australia’s behalf.

After the Second World War, Armistice Day became Remembrance Day, a time to commemorate war dead from all conflicts. Learn more about the Origins of Remembrance Day.