The 19th Battalion was raised at Liverpool in New South Wales in March 1915 as part of the 5th Brigade. A large number of the 19th's original recruits had already served with the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) in the operations to capture German New Guinea in 1914. The 19th left Australia in late June, trained in Egypt from late July until mid-August, and on 21 August landed at ANZAC Cove.

At Gallipoli the Battalion participated in the last action of the August Offensive ' the attack on Hill 60 ' before settling into defensive routine in the trenches. From mid-September, until its withdrawal from the peninsula on the night of 19 December, the 19th Battalion was responsible for the defence of Pope's Hill.

After further training in Egypt, the 19th Battalion proceeded to France. It took part in its first major offensive around Pozieres between late July and the end of August 1916. After a spell in a quieter sector of the front in Belgium, the 2nd Division, which included the 5th Brigade, came south again in October. The 19th Battalion attacked near Flers between 14 and 16 November, in conditions that Charles Bean described as the worst ever encountered by the AIF.

In 1917, the 19th was involved in the follow-up of German forces after their retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and was one of four battalions to defeat a counter-stroke by a German force, almost five times as strong, at Lagincourt. The Battalion took part in three major battles before the year was out, second Bullecourt (3-4 May) in France, and Menin Road (20-22 September) and Poelcappelle (9-10 October) in Belgium.

The spring of 1918 brought a major German offensive that the 19th Battalion helped to stop. For his actions during the fighting around Hangard Wood on 7 April, Lieutenant Percy Storkey was awarded the Victoria Cross. With this last desperate offensive defeated, the 19th participated in the battles that pushed the German Army ever closer to defeat: Amiens on 8 August, the legendary attack on Mont St Quentin on 31 August, and the forcing of the Beaurevoir Line around Montbrehain on 3 October. Montbrehain was the battalion's last battle. The casualties of 1918, combined with long-term leave for 1914 enlistees, and dwindling new enlistments had sapped the strength of the AIF. On 10 October 1918 the 19th Battalion was disbanded to reinforce other battalions in the brigade.
References
  • AWM 224: MSS 145 '19th Australian Infantry Battalion: brief summary of events. 1915-1918'
  • AWM4/23/36/1-23/36/33
    • CategoryUnit
      Related places
    • Liverpool
    • Pope's Hill
      • Related conflicts First World War, 1914-1918
        Related events
      • Attack on Hill 60
      • Battle of Pozieres
      • Second Battle of Bullecourt
      • Battle of Menin Road
      • German Spring Offensive
      • Battle of Amiens
      • Battle of Montbrehain
      • Battle of Lagnicourt
      • Battle of Poelcappelle
        • Battle honours
        • Somme, 1916, '18
        • Pozières
        • Bapaume, 1917
        • Bullecourt
        • Ypres, 1917
        • Menin Road
        • Polygon Wood
        • Broodseinde
        • Poelcappelle
        • Passchendaele
        • Hamel
        • Amiens
        • Albert, 1918
        • Mont St. Quentin
        • Hindenburg Line
        • Beaurevoir
        • France and Flanders, 1916-18
        • Suvla
        • Gallipoli, 1915
        • Egypt, 1915-16
          • Commanding officers
          • Mackenzie, William Kenneth Seaforth
          • Pye, Cecil Robert Arthur
          • Beiers, Harold Mathieson
            • Decorations1 VC; 5 DSO; 1 OBE; 31 MC, 2 bars; 20 DCM; 84 MM, 5 bars; 8 MSM; 19 MID; 6 foreign awards
              Alternative names
              • 19 Battalion
              • 19 Bn
              • 19 Infantry Battalion
              • 19th Australian Infantry Battalion
              • 19th Battalion
              • 19th Battalion (Infantry)
              • 19th Bn
              Unit hierarchy