Harry Thomas Whiteside as a member of 1 SAS Squadron, 7 RAR and 1 RAR interviewed by Greg Swanborough for 'The sharp end'

Places
Accession Number F10658
Collection type Film
Measurement 13 min 14 sec
Object type To be confirmed
Physical description 16mm/colour (Eastman)/sound
Maker The Notion Picture Company Pty Limited
Whiteside, Harry Thomas
Swanborough, Greg
Place made Australia: New South Wales, Sydney
Date made 6 June 1992
Access Open
Conflict Period 1990-1999
Vietnam, 1962-1975
Copyright

Item copyright: AWM Licensed copyright

Copying Provisions Copy provided subject to permission from copyright holder
Description

1 SAS Squadron 20 April 1967 to 27 October 1967. 7 RAR 28 October 1967 to 10 April 1968. 1 RAR 11 April 1968 to 20 August 1968. Scene 14, Take 1: Role of SAS in 1967 was primarily one of reconnaissance associated with efficient information gathering to allow taskforce commander to effectively plan operations. Insertion into known or suspect enemy territory and monitor activities. Just as important to know if they were not there. SAS patrol group usually four to five men working alone a long distance from base. Generally avoid contact with enemy. Battalion platoons carried out tasks associated with searching out and engaging with enemy. Insertion into enemy territory usually late evening. Contact necessitated immediate extraction by helicopter and reinsertion later. Worked close to enemy. Description of camouflage makeup and clothing. Scene 14, Take 2, roll 70: The most dangerous times were at time of insertion and extraction when helicopter and team vulnerable. Fear of going into unknown. Difference between SAS ambush and platoon ambush. Platoon large group and stayed in the field after ambush. SAS team only four or five men and after contact got out quick. One occasion stayed in field seven days because air extraction not available. Remembers friendships and living on the edge. SAS never put into Laos, Cambodia or demilitarised zone. Talks about controversial and secret agreements. The nature of operations dictated a degree of secrecy.