Travelling Exhibition

ACTION! Film & War

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DAILY AT 4:45PM AEDT

Last Post Ceremony

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Development project

Our Continuing Story

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Research at the Memorial

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80TH ANNIVERSARY

Papuan campaign, 1942 - 43

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The Australian War Memorial is open to the public with a new temporary entrance.

Visitors will require timed tickets to enter the Memorial galleries, and also to attend the daily Last Post Ceremony at 4:45 pm in the Commemorative Area.

Ticket bookings open now.

Access to the Memorial entrance and visitor carpark is via Fairbairn Avenue. 

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Remembrance Day 2022

On Friday, 11 November 2022 the Australian War Memorial held the Remembrance Day National Ceremony. 

The National Ceremony can be viewed on the Memorial’s Facebook page

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ACTION! Film & War

ACTION! Film & War follows Australians armed with cameras who have shared their experiences as they record history and bear witness to conflict – either as a professional duty or for their personal record.

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2022 Napier Waller Art Prize

This online exhibition presents finalists in the 2022 Napier Waller Art Prize and those entries awarded 'highly commended' by the judging panel.

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Australians at war

Learn about Australia's involvement in war, from the time of the first settlement at Sydney Cove in the 18th century to our peacekeeping roles under United Nations auspices.

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Indigenous service

Explore a selection of resources related to the wartime experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Please be advised that the following pages contain the names, images and objects of deceased people.

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Sufferings of War and Service

The Australian War Memorial has worked with veterans and their advocates to commission a work of art, by artist Alex Seton, to recognise and commemorate the suffering caused by war and military service.

 
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Papuan campaign, 1942 - 43

The opening months of 1942 were perhaps the darkest days of the Second World War for Australia, with the seemingly unstoppable advance of Imperial Japanese forces across Asia and into the Pacific. 

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FEATURED ARTICLES
  1. Albert Davey had a feeling he was about to die. A 32-year-old miner from Ballarat, Victoria, he had left his wife and child to serve with the 1st Australian Tunnelling Company on the Western Front. He was one of the last Australians killed-in-action during the First World War,

  2. Anneke Jamieson always loved to draw. But it is one of Jamieson’s paintings, The promotion, that has captured the public imagination, winning both the Napier Waller Art Prize and the People's Choice award.

  3. Art has always been an important part of Julian Thompson’s life.

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