The Last Post Ceremony commemorating the service of Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove, 10th Battalion, AIF, First World War

Accession Number PAFU2014/101.01
Collection type Film
Object type Last Post film
Physical description 16:9
Maker Australian War Memorial
Place made Australia: Australian Capital Territory, Canberra, Campbell
Date made 31 March 2014
Access Open
Conflict First World War, 1914-1918
Copyright Item copyright: © Australian War Memorial
Creative Commons License This item is licensed under CC BY-NC
Copying Provisions Copy provided for personal non-commercial use
Description

The Last Post Ceremony is presented in the Commemorative area of the Australian War Memorial each day. The ceremony commemorates more than 102,000 Australians who have given their lives in war and other operations and whose names are recorded on the Roll of Honour. At each ceremony the story behind one of the names on the Roll of Honour is told. Hosted by Troy Clayton, the story for this day was on Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove, 10th Battalion, AIF, First World War.

Speech transcript

Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove, 10th Battalion, AIF
KIA 23 August, 1918
Photograph: E01783 (middle row, fourth from left)

Story delivered 31 March 2014

Today we remember and pay tribute to Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove.

Edward Angove was born on 15 June 1884 at Mildenhall in Suffolk, England, to Doctor William Thomas and Emma Carlyon Angove. In 1896 the family immigrated to Australia and settled in Adelaide, where Doctor Angove began making wine. Following his death in 1912, Edward and his brother, Thomas, took over the burgeoning wine-making business.

Angove enlisted for service in the AIF in March 1916, and after serving as a sergeant in training units he received his commission as a second lieutenant in September. At this time he was also attached to the 23rd reinforcements to the 10th Battalion.

He embarked with his unit from Outer Harbour, Adelaide, on 12 December 1916 aboard the transport ship Berrima. Not long after arriving in England, Angove was hospitalised, suffering from rheumatism. After recovering, he attended a training school before transferring to France in July 1917. It wasn't until early August that he joined his battalion. He was promoted to lieutenant and early the following month was sent to I ANZAC school. He returned to the battalion at the end of October.

Angove's first major action came in March and April 1918, when the 10th Battalion was involved in halting the German Spring Offensive near Amiens. Following leave in June, he took part in the battalion's capture of Merris in July. A little over a week later the battalion took part in the August Offensive which drove the German army back as far as eight miles on the first day.

On 23 August the 10th Battalion was involved in an attack on Luc Wood, near Bray-sur-Somme. After establishing new positions, the battalion prepared for its next
move. It was during this time that Angove, standing outside a dugout, was hit in the neck by shrapnel from a shell burst and killed instantly. He was buried nearby the following morning. After the war, Angove's body was relocated to the cemetery at Harbonnières.

His name is listed on the Roll of Honour on my right, along with more than 60,000 others from the First World War, and his photograph is displayed today beside the Pool of Reflection.

This is but one of the many stories of courage and sacrifice told here at the Australian War Memorial. We now remember Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove, and all of those Australians who have given their lives in service of our nation.

  • Video of The Last Post Ceremony commemorating the service of Lieutenant Edward Laurence Angove, 10th Battalion, AIF, First World War (video)