[Sheet music] Blighty (The Soldiers Home, Sweet Home)

Accession Number RC10841
Collection number Sheet Music Collection 356
Collection type Published Collection
Measurement Overall - closed: 33.4 cm x 25.4 cm
Object type Sheet Music
Maker Weston, R P
Lee, Bert
Date made c 1916
Conflict First World War, 1914-1918
Copying Provisions Recording provided for personal, non-commercial and commemorative use. Permission from copyright holder must be sought for commercial use. Attached digital images provided for personal non-commercial use
Description

Sheet music for the song titled 'Blighty (The Soldier's Home, Sweet Home)' written and composed by English songwriters Robert Patrick Weston and Bert Lee. The song was published in 1916.

The cover features the endosement that the song is 'sung by Miss Maie Ash in Fred Allandale's Nautical Revue "Heave-O"', accompanied by a photographic portrait of Maie Ash. The cover verso features advertising previews of three works also published by Francis, Day & Hunter: 'The Roses Have Made Me Remember', written by Lilian Grey and Herman Darewski; 'You'll Always be the Same Sweet Baby', written by A Seymour Brown; and 'The Fisher Maid of Old St. Malo', written by Stephen Stansmore and Armand Dumas. The reverse cover features four lists of song compilations published by Francis, Day & Hunter.

Weston was born as Robert Harris at lslington, London, where his father ran a grocery shop. He collaborated with Bert Lee in the art of songwriting between 1915 until 1935 after meeting at the offices of Francis Day & Hunter. His son, Robert Harris Weston, subsequently collaborated with the two men in the production of 'Harmonica Dan' in 1936. The Weston and Lee duo also collaborated with Stanley Holloway and Gracie Fields. One of their earliest songs was 'Paddy McGinty's Goat' with later works including several popular wartime songs such as the tongue twister 'Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts for Soldiers', the tribute to farewells 'Good-Bye-Ee' and the original song 'Hush here comes the dream man', that was later reworked by soldiers into the parody 'Hush here comes a whizzbang'.

Bert Lee collaborated with Robert Patrick Weston in the art of songwriting between 1915 until 1935 after meeting at the offices of Francis Day & Hunter. Robert Harris Weston, the son of Robert Patrick Weston, subsequently collaborated with the duo in the production of 'Harmonica Dan' in 1936. The Weston and Lee duo also went on to work with Stanley Holloway and Gracie Fields. One of their earliest songs was 'Paddy McGinty's Goat', while later works included several popular wartime songs such as the tongue twister 'Sister Susie's Sewing Shirts for Soldiers', the tribute to farewells 'Good-Bye-Ee' and the original song 'Hush here comes the dream man', that was later reworked by soldiers into the parody 'Hush here comes a whizzbang'.



Towards the bottom of this page is a sound recording of this sheet music, or a parody, that was created as part of the Music and the First World War project. More information about this recording, including names of the performers, can be found on the catalogue record for the sound recording. A link to the catalogue record for the sound recording can be found at the bottom of this page, under the heading ‘Related objects’ where it can be identified with the prefix [sound recording].

History / Summary

This song, or possibly songs with a similar name, was performed at several concerts organised or attended by Australian service personnel during the First World War. A performance of a song with this name was performed by an Australian soldier identified only as Ward at a concert by the 4 Australian Brigade Concert Party in France on 14 July 1917. A song titled 'Blighty' featured in a concert held at the Australian Engineers training depot in Brightlingsea, England at 6pm on Thursday 16 August 1917. The song appeared in part three of 'The Great Australian Drama', a section titled 'A dinkum Australian bush hop', where it was described as a 'two-step'. Sergeant Richard Harper, who served with the 2nd Australian Divisional Mechanical Transport Company, performed this song at a concert organised by 4 Australian Ammunition Sub-Park in France on 30 August 1917. Another appearance of this song occured in the pantomime 'Dick Whittington and his cat', where it featured in the second act. No individual artist is attributed to its performance but the pantomime was performed by the ANZAC Coves during Christmas 1917. This song was also performed during a concert given by the band of the Irish Guards on an unknown date, which may have been attended by Australian service personnel.