Notebook of Thomas Joseph Lynch, 1944-1945

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Accession Number AWM2019.22.213
Collection number PR04658
Collection type Digitised Collection
Record type Item
Item count 1
Object type Notebook
Physical description 40 Image/s captured
Maker Lynch, Thomas Joseph (Tom)
Place made United Kingdom: England
Date made 1944-1945
Conflict Second World War, 1939-1945
Copying Provisions Attached digital images and content are protected by copyright. They are reproduced here for research and study only. If you wish to use or quote from these images, please contact the Memorial’s Research Centre via info@awm.gov.au or 02 6243 4315.
Source credit to This item has been digitised with funding provided by Commonwealth Government.
Description

Notebook relating to the Second World War service of 414807 Flight Lieutenant Thomas Joseph Lynch, 460 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force.

In his notebook, Lynch relates the story of his experiences between April 1944 and January 1945, in which he was an air gunner in a bombing crew and later a prisoner of war of the Germans. He begins his story on 5 May 1944, when he woke up to find himself in a German hospital with one of his legs amputated. He then recalls events such as sending his first letter home, hearing of his crew members deaths, being violently threatened by another patient, being transferred to a different hospital, his leg wound becoming seriously infected and being in severe pain, treatment by kind medical staff, receiving blood transfusions from other Allied prisoners of war, meeting his two new roommates and hearing their stories, having visitors interested in the new medical procedures being developed and used on the prisoners, standing and using crutches for the first time since his amputation, and being moved to yet another hospital, this time at Stalag IXC. Lynch concludes his story with details of the prisoner of war camp, including being treated by Allied doctors who were prisoners themselves, eating rations of black bread, meeting numerous patients with severe burns to their bodies and faces, spending Christmas in the camp, and finally being repatriated to England in early 1945.