Invasion of southern France

15 August 1944 - 12 September 1944

The invasion of southern France was originally intended as a diversion for the Normandy landings but logistical difficulties ultimately prevented it from being launched at the same time. It was persisted with, however, to provide ports to land men and supplies shipped directly from the United States.

The landings on the French Rivieria took place on 15 August 1944. Despite extensive German defences, the predominantly American and French landing forces suffered few casualties due to overwhelming superiority of troop numbers, fire and air power. The resulting campaign became principally a pursuit as the Allied forces sought to cut-off the Germans as they retreated northwards. The Allied forces that landed in southern France met with those that landed at Normandy to the north of Dijon on 12 September 1944. The aims of the campaign were validated: by October 1944 the southern French ports were handling over a third of the supplies landed for the Allied armies in France.